VIDEO: 6 Best Practices in Creating Employee Engagement Surveys

 

6 Best Practices in Creating Employee Engagement Surveys

 
In the VIDEO: 6 Best Practices in Creating Employee Engagement Surveys I cover six ways to form questions in order to create a survey that will obtain the best and most accurate responses possible. By creating a powerful employee engagement survey you will accurately measure your organizations levels of engagement like never before. 
 

Join the WEBINAR: “Employee Engagement Survey Best Practices” and get HRCI or SHRM credit

 

  1. Use a subset of anchor questions to measure overall engagement.

    The most accurate way to measure employee engagement is to use the average score from a subset of validated anchor questions. We then use the score from the anchor questions to place employees in one of four different groups from Fully Engaged to Fully Disengaged.

 

  1. Use a variety of questions to measure employee perceptions regarding their work, their team, their boss, and the organization overall.

    These items will be used to determine unique perceptions among the different engagement groups of employees. Also include items to measure the five major drivers of employee engagement, which are: Meaning, Autonomy, Growth, Impact, and Connection.

 

  1. Use proper question structure and formatting:

    Good questions are actionable, meaning that it is obvious what actions to take based on the item. So avoid vague or general statements that can be interpreted in a variety of ways. Also, don’t use double-barreled questions which are items that contain two ideas in one question. Finally, use questions that are positively worded with a consistent rating scale.

 

  1. Customize the survey so that it is relevant to your organization.

    Every organization is unique, so make sure to include items that evaluate recent changes, alignment with company values, or other pertinent issues. But don’t go too far. If you customize too much, you won’t be able to utilize industry benchmarks on similar questions.

 

  1. Use two or maybe three open-ended questions.

    We recommend asking: “What are the areas that need the most improvement in our organization?” and “What are the greatest strengths of our organization?” These two items will generate good qualitative feedback that provides context to the scores on the other survey questions. Don’t use too many open-ended questions because it makes the survey run long and it doesn’t provide any additional feedback.

 

  1. Use between 40-60 questions total.

    A survey with 50 questions takes about 8 minutes to complete. If your survey is too short, then it doesn’t provide enough information to make specific conclusions and it becomes in actionable. If it is too long, employees will not finish it and you could also end up with too much information with leads to data paralysis.

 

Want to learn more? Download our whitepaper, “10 Questions to Consider Before Your Next Employee Engagement Survey” to learn more about building the most effective survey possible. 

Take a look at more videos to assist in building a better organization:

VIDEO: 5 Employee Engagement Best Practices

VIDEO: Employee Satisfaction and Engagement. What’s the Difference?

VIDEO: The Influence of Managers on Employee Engagement

VIDEO: The Impact of 360-Degree Feedback Coaching

 

Thanks for reading or watching and best of luck in your efforts to create an engaged workplace.

 

Employee Engagement Survey

VIDEO: 5 Employee Engagement Best Practices

State-of-Employee-Engagement-Report

5 Employee Engagement Best Practices

In the VIDEO: 5 Employee Engagement Best Practices I share 5 employee engagement best practices from our 2016 State of Employee Engagement Report.

To compile this report, we surveyed HR professionals from over 200 organizations around the world on what they were doing to address employee engagement.

Join the WEBINAR: “Employee Engagement Survey Best Practices” and get HRCI or SHRM credit

For one of the questions, we asked, “Based on any employee survey results over the past 3 years, has the overall level of employee engagement in your organization trended upward, stayed the same, or gone down.” 32% of organizations reported engagement trending upward, 28% stayed the same, and 17% reported engagement had actually decreased. 

Companies with Employee Engagement Trending Upward

 

When we looked at the 32% who reported engagement trended upward over the past 3 years, here is what we found:

 

1.         Successful companies consistently measure employee engagement.

Most companies with rising levels of employee engagement have measured it at least every year for the past three years or more.

 

2.         Successful companies do better at involving managers in the action planning process.

Companies with upward trending levels of employee engagement also reported that more managers are involved in action planning.

Involve Managers in Action Planning

3.         Successful companies train managers on employee engagement.

Training managers on employee engagement, and training in general, were two similarities among companies with rising levels of engagement. So investing in the development of your managers pays off in increased engagement.

Train Managers on Employee Engagement

4.        Successful companies measure the ROI of employee engagement.

Specifically, companies that compare their engagement efforts to retention and other performance metrics do better at increasing engagement overall.

Measure the ROI of Employee Engagement

5.         Successful companies work with an outside provider.

Almost 60% of companies with rising levels of engagement report that they partner with service providers to enhance employee engagement. So if your employee engagement program has stalled, you may benefit from the expertise of outside engagement professionals.

Companies tend to work with Employee Engagement outside partners

Want to learn more? Download our 2016 State of Employee Engagement Report to learn about other best practices and to see how your organization compares. This 58-page report shows specifically what organizations are doing to measure and increase employee engagement. 

Take a look at more videos to assist in building a better organization:

VIDEO: 5 Employee Engagement Best Practices

VIDEO: Employee Satisfaction and Engagement. What’s the Difference?

VIDEO: The Influence of Managers on Employee Engagement

VIDEO: The Impact of 360-Degree Feedback Coaching

 

Thanks for reading or watching and best of luck in your efforts to create an engaging workplace.

Employee Engagement Survey

VIDEO: Employee Satisfaction and Engagement. What's the Difference?

Employee Satisfaction vs. Employee Engagement

What are the differences between employee satisfaction and employee engagement?

Employee satisfaction is the extent to which the employment contract is fulfilled. Employees feel satisfied when basic hygiene factors are met. These factors include pay, benefits, job training, safety, and the tools and resources to do the job. Other things that drive satisfaction are perks such as free lunch, day care, or working from home.

Download: Employee Engagement Survey

Satisfaction elements help to attract new employees and retain existing employees. For example, if your company offers the best healthcare benefits in the area, you will probably receive more job applications and employees will be less likely to leave and forfeit their health plan.

Employee satisfaction is very important because it creates the foundation upon which engagement can thrive. Employees must first be satisfied before they can be engaged.
MAGIC - DecisionWise

We define employee engagement as an emotional state where we feel passionate, energetic, and committed toward our work. In turn, we fully invest our best selves—our hearts, spirits, minds, and hands—in the work we do.

The five drivers of employee engagement are Meaning, Autonomy, Growth, Impact, and Connection. Meaning is finding purpose in the work you perform. Autonomy is having the freedom to do your best work. Growth is feeling stretched and challenged in your job. Impact is about making a difference and getting things done. And Connection is about belonging to something greater than yourself.

So where satisfaction helps to attract and retain employees, engagement also helps with retention but it is the main driver of performance. Engaged employees want to do their best work and deliver results for the company.

Satisfaction is more transactional– you pay me and I do my work- engagement is transformational – where I love my job and want to make a difference.

Both concepts are important. No matter how engaged employees are in their work, if they feel under-compensated, a satisfaction element, their engagement will suffer and they will probably look for other job opportunities.

If you would like to learn how to measure both the satisfaction and engagement levels of your employees, download the DecisionWise employee engagement survey. Thanks for reading or watching and best of luck in your efforts to create an engaging workplace.

Take a look at more videos to assist in building a better organization:

VIDEO: 5 Employee Engagement Best Practices

VIDEO: Employee Satisfaction and Engagement. What’s the Difference?

VIDEO: The Influence of Managers on Employee Engagement

VIDEO: The Impact of 360-Degree Feedback Coaching

 

Employee Engagement Survey

VIDEO: The Influence of Managers on Employee Engagement

Engaged Employees


Download: Employee Engagement Survey

Let’s talk about our research on the Influence of Managers on Employee Engagement.

We recently conducted the largest study of its kind to compare the level of employee engagement of managers to that of their direct reports. This study included data from 22 companies, almost 19,000 employees, and 2,300 managers.

We first measured the overall level of engagement for each individual using a set of research-based anchor questions from their annual employee survey. We then grouped managers and employees according to their level of engagement into four categories: Fully Engaged, Key Contributors, Opportunity Group, and Fully Disengaged. Then we compared the level of engagement of managers to the employees they lead. 

Employee Engagement Example Graph

For the 808 managers that were Fully Engaged, we found that 36% of their employees were also Fully Engaged, 48% were Key Contributors, 12% were in the Opportunity Group, and only 3% were Fully Disengaged. 

For the 1154 managers who were Key Contributors, the level of fully engaged employees drops to 24%. So the percentage of fully engaged employees increases 50% from a Key Contributor manager to a Fully Engaged manager.

For managers in the Opportunity Group and Fully Disengaged categories, only 14% of their employees were fully engaged.

So you can see that fully engaged managers lead more engaged employees. That finding, in of itself, is not very surprising, but what is important, is that the percentage of fully engaged employees increases 163% from Opportunity Group managers and Fully Disengaged managers to Fully Engaged managers. That’s a huge difference. 

So how do you engage managers? Here are 3 best-practice recommendations:

3 Ways to Engage Managers

 

Employee Engagement Survey

How Engaged Are You at Work?

DecisionWise ENGAGEMENT MAGIC Self Assessment

How engaged are you at work? Do you knock on your boss’s door, complain that you’re not feeling engaged at work, and demand that he does something about it? Of course not. The process begins with you, not your employer.

Business People Meeting Discussion Working Office Concept

An organization can provide air hockey tables in the break room or casual Fridays, but even the greatest of perks can’t magically convert unhappy employees into happy ones. YOU are the best predictor of your own engagement.

Have you ever heard the phrase, “Wherever you go, there you are?” Remember, you are the only constant that you take with you from situation to situation. The auto-disengaged person in one organization will be the auto-disengaged person in her next organization.

Download: Employee Engagement Survey

You are responsible for your ability or inability to engage, regardless of your position within your organization or your organization’s efforts to “get employees engaged.” The truth is that some people will find a way to engage no matter what. The interesting thing here is that workplace engagement often spills over to home-life engagement. While we may try to separate work and personal lives, the fact is that we are whole individuals, rather than tidy segments; home life, community life, work life, social life, and so forth all flow into one another. If you are disengaged at work, chances are you’ll be disengaged in other areas of your life as well.

If you’re saying to yourself, “This company isn’t an engaging place to work” take a look in the mirror. Engagement is a 50-50 proposition between employer and employee. But the individual has as much power to drive employer engagement initiatives as the top decision makers do. You can’t wait for your employer to come to you, because doing so presupposes that your employer (1) fully understands engagement; (2) realizes that you and others are not engaged; and (3) knows the unique factors that will engage you, the individual.

DecisionWise ENGAGEMENT MAGIC Self Assessment

Remember, the employee engagement process begins with you, the employee, not your employer. To assist you and your fellow employees in accurately measuring your current levels of engagement, we’ve create a free tool that can be used anytime and as often as you choose. It’s called the ENGAGEMENT MAGIC® Self-Assessment. MAGIC is the acronym for the five essential keys needed to obtain true employee engagement: Meaning, Autonomy, Growth, Impact, and Connection.

Take the free ENGAGEMENT MAGIC® Self-Assessment Now

Take 10 minutes and dig into the assessment. When you know more about how engaged you are, you’ll have a much clearer idea of how engaged you wish to become and what to do about it.

Employee Engagement is a Spectrum

Employee engagement is not absolute. It is a spectrum, not an absolute state. You are not going to feel engaged all the time in your work or personal life. Can you imagine feeling exalted and in the flow when you’re, say, changing a toilet paper roll in the office bathroom? Of course not. But it’s an illustration of the fact that you will not feel 100 percent engaged 100 percent of the time. No one does. Your level of engagement will rise and fall from moment to moment depending on:

Employee Engagement Spectrum Infographic

• What you’re doing
• How you’re feeling physically and emotionally
• Your life outside work and its relationship to your work
• How well your satisfaction and motivational needs (compensation, perks, physical security, etc.) are being met
• The levels of meaning, autonomy, growth, impact, and connection (ENGAGEMENT MAGIC®) present in your organizational culture at the time
• A myriad of other factors, some not even related to the organization you belong to

Those are all fluid states, so at a given point in time the snapshot of your engagement level will also be fluid. That doesn’t matter so much. What does matter is your level of engagement over the long term. Over months and quarters, the ups and downs even out and a clear picture emerges. Patterns take shape: Your work brings you strong meaning, but you have few mechanisms to determine your impact. That’s correctable, and as long as your level of engagement is generally positive and trending upward, it’s fine if on a given day you don’t feel like an employee in a company where you are racing around on a scooter, listening to house music, and celebrating your stock options.

View the Employee Engagement Spectrum Infographic

Employee Engagement Survey

What is Employee Engagement?

engaged employees

What is employee engagement? Taken from the book, ENGAGEMENT MAGIC: Five Keys for Engaging People, Leaders, and Organizations:

“Employee Engagement is an emotional state where we feel passionate, energetic, and committed toward our work. In turn, we fully invest our best selves––our hearts, spirits, minds, and hands––in the work we do.”

The heart is about meaning, passion, fulfillment, even finding joy in what you do. Spirit is about attitude, energy, and excitement. It’s something that can be felt when you walk into a room or work with a highly engaged team. Heart and spirit imply that we must feel the work that we do.

Unfortunately, that’s where most engagement models stop, and that’s a mistake. There is more to engagement that just “feeling something.” The mind is about intellect, interests, curiosity, and creativity. The hands are about effort, productivity, and self-determination- using your skills and sweat to produce something of value. Mind and hands imply that we must do something. In order to be fully engaged, we must act. To put it simply:

Heart and Spirit = Feeling

Mind and Hands = Action

Engagement requires that we bring both our emotions and our actions to the table- our hearts, spirits, minds, and hands. To be engaged, we must feel something and take action on what we feel. Take one away and you don’t have engagement. You can think of feelings and actions as two oars in a rowboat. They are complementary opposites. Both are necessary. Row with one and you’ll travel in circles. You might work up a sweat and feel as though you should be getting somewhere, but you won’t. Pull with both at the same time and you’ll make progress.

Think of this in terms of your own experience. Have you felt the energy that comes with doing something you feel is worthwhile, something that really floats your boat? How did it feel? What did it cause you to do?

Employee Engagement Survey

INFOGRAPHIC: The ROI of Employee Engagement

Infographic-ROI-of-Employee-Engagement

Do Employee Engagement Initiatives Really Work? What’s the payoff?

We asked human resources executives and managers in over 200 organizations around the world about the return on investment from employee engagement initiatives and impact that employee engagement has on the organization.

Download PDF Version of Infographic: The ROI of Employee Engagement

Infographic-ROI-of-Employee-Engagement

When asked: How would you describe the impact of employee engagement on your organization overall?

The overall response was, “POSITIVE.” Some open-ended comments were:

“Huge impact!”

“It’s a work in progress and we have a long way to go still.”

“Very positive to our cultural goals.”

“It is vital to providing quality care and fulfilling our mission in the community, so we take it very seriously.”

When asked: Does your organization measure its return on investment (ROI) for employee engagement programs?

We found that only 9% of companies measure the ROI of their employee engagement programs.

When asked: Which of the following metrics are compared to employee engagement scores in your company? Please check all that apply: Employee Retention, Performance Metrics, Customer Satisfaction, Profitability, Product/Service Quality, Other.

We learned that most companies compare employee engagement survey scores to retention numbers followed by other performance metrics.

When asked: In what ways have you seen a return on the organization’s investment in employee engagement?

We found that companies report higher satisfaction, retention, and performance as a result of their investment in employee engagement.

When asked: How strongly do you agree with the following statement: “Our program(s) to improve employee engagement has (have) given us the ROI/results we hoped for.

Only 27% of companies believe that their programs to improve employee engagement have produced the ROI they hoped for.

The ROI from employee engagement most frequently reported is employee retention. Overall, the research shows that most companies aren’t doing a very good job at tracking ROI from their employee engagement initiatives, but most report positive benefits and outcomes, especially retention.

Download 2016 State of Employee Engagement Report

INFOGRAPHIC: 8 Employee Engagement Mythbusters
INFOGRAPHIC: ENGAGEMENT MAGIC® – Five Keys to Unlock the Power of Employee Engagement
INFOGRAPHIC: What Do Engaged Organizations Look Like?
INFOGRAPHIC: Employee Engagement vs. Satisfaction. What’s the Difference?
INFOGRAPHIC: 5 Personal Employee Engagement Wins
INFOGRAPHIC: Where Do You Land on the Employee Engagement Spectrum?

INFOGRAPHIC: ENGAGEMENT MAGIC – Five Keys to Unlock the Power of Employee Engagement

Engaged employees

What is Employee Engagement?

Employee engagement is an emotional state where employees feel passionate, energetic, and committed to their work. This translates into employees who give their hearts, spirits, minds, and hands to deliver a high level of performance to the organization.

When we first look to join an organization, we may be enticed by some salary promises, the company brand, or cool perks. Important? Of course. But these factors, called “satisfaction elements,” don’t increase employee engagement. Engagement goes beyond satisfaction. Employee engagement occurs when we find meaning, autonomy, growth, impact, and connection–MAGIC–in what we do.

5 keys for engaging people infographic

Employee Engagement is collaborative.

Employee engagement is a 50-50 proposition–a two-way street. Yes, the organization is responsible for creating an environment where engagement can flourish, but the employee has an equal responsibility to CHOOSE to be engaged.

Employee Engagement is MAGIC

The data–lots and lots of data–is what sets ENGAGEMENT MAGIC apart. Over the years, DecisionWise has deployed assessments in thousands of organizations in more than 70 countries and in more than 30 languages.

From these assessments, DecisionWise has built an engagement database of more than 50 million responses. ENGAGEMENT MAGIC: Five Keys for Engaging People, Leaders, and Organizations summarizes this research and provides a guide for managers to increase engagement.

Do you like Infographics? Here are some more for your enjoyment:

5 Growth Conversations to Engage and Retain Your Employees

How Leaders Can Help Shape The Employee Experience in Times of Crisis

The Cost of a Bad Manager

Employee Engagement eLEARNING

How to Manage Poor Attitudes and Negativity in the Workplace (INFOGRAPHIC)

Negativity in the workplace has a stronger influence on an organization than positivity, so it is crucial to manage it quickly and effectively. In this infographic, learn the effects of negative attitudes in the workplace and how to better manage negative attitudes in your personal environment, or within the team you manage.

Poor attitudes

Infographic by Quill

Employee Engagement Survey
More Infographics:

INFOGRAPHIC: 8 Employee Engagement Mythbusters
INFOGRAPHIC: Employee Engagement vs. Satisfaction. What’s the Difference?
INFOGRAPHIC: 5 Personal Employee Engagement Wins
INFOGRAPHIC: Where Do You Land on the Employee Engagement Spectrum?